Malaria eradication calls for detection and treatment of asymptomatic cases

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Malaria eradication calls for detection and treatment of asymptomatic cases
Malaria eradication calls for detection and treatment of asymptomatic cases

Asymptomatic malaria infections, as widely believed, do not reduce the risk of serious illness, but suppress the immune system and prevent the removal of parasites remaining in the bloodstream. , The study suggests.

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 241 million malaria cases worldwide occurred in 2020, of which 627,000 died. The disease is caused by Plasmodium malaria, which is transmitted by the bites of female Anopheles mosquitoes.

Plasmodium malaria after repeated infections over the years Some people develop immunity to Plasmodium, but have a small number of parasites that continue to live in the bloodstream without causing the typical fever-like symptoms. , Says Walter’s associate professor, Diana Hansen, at the Eliza Hall Medical Institute in Melbourne, Australia.

“These infections have historically been considered beneficial because they were thought to provide protection against symptomatic diseases,” said a member of the team that published their findings in molecular systems biology. Hansen says.

“Based on this assumption, asymptomatic malaria is often not treated in malaria endemic countries, despite a poor understanding of the actual effects of these persistent infections on people.”

Hansen emphasized that asymptomatic malaria infections are common in endemic areas, “recent studies estimate that their prevalence is up to five times higher than symptomatic infections. “.

At the heart of the malaria eradication agenda is the challenge that asymptomatic infections bring to control efforts. This clinically silent parasite reservoir has been shown to contribute to the persistence of infection. Progress towards the WHO malaria eradication goal by 2030 has been stalled in many endemic countries since 2015. “

Diana Hansen, Associate Professor, Walter and Eliza Hall Medical Institute, Melbourne, Australia

The researchers analyzed the leukocytes of patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic infections in endemic areas of Indonesia. They found that patients with asymptomatic chronic malaria infections suppress the immune system and produce more protein to help the parasite survive.

Hansen says the body cannot control the parasites and remove them from the bloodstream because the immune system is suppressed and unable to function fully. The immune system doesn’t have the ability to train properly, “he explains.

“When treating people with asymptomatic malaria infections, we will also reduce the invisible reservoir of parasites that will perpetuate the infection and prevent efforts in the malaria eradication campaign,” he said, and the study considers. Provides a framework for. New policies and treatments to support screening. Incidence of asymptomatic malaria in endemic areas around the world.

Asymptomatic malaria infections are not thought to reduce the risk of serious illness, but they do suppress the immune system and prevent the elimination of parasites left in the bloodstream. , Propose research.

According to the World Health Organization, in 2020, 241 million cases of malaria were reported worldwide, of which 627,000 died. The disease is caused by malaria, which is transmitted by the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito.

Although some people develop immunity to vivax malaria protozoa after repeated infections over the years, there are some parasites that continue to live in the bloodstream without causing the typical symptoms of fever. Diane Hansen, Walter Associate Professor at the Eliza Hall Medical Institute in Melbourne, Australia, says.

“These infections have historically been considered beneficial because they were thought to provide protection against symptomatic disease,” said a member of the group announcing her findings in molecular systems biology. Hansen says.

“According to this assumption, asymptomatic malaria often goes untreated in malaria-endemic countries, despite little understanding of the real effects of these persistent infections in humans.”

Hansen emphasized that asymptomatic malaria infections are common in endemic areas, “recent studies have shown that their prevalence is up to five times higher than symptomatic infections.

At the heart of the malaria eradication challenge is the challenge that asymptomatic infections present to control efforts. This clinically asymptomatic parasitic reservoir has been shown to contribute to the persistence of infection. Progress towards the WHO goal of eradicating malaria by 2030 has stalled in many endemic countries since 2015.”

Diana Hansen, Associate Professor, Walter and Eliza Hall Medical Institute, Melbourne, Australia

The researchers analyzed leukocytes from patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic infections in endemic areas of Indonesia. They found that patients with chronic asymptomatic malaria infections suppress the immune system and produce more proteins to help the parasite survive.

Hansen says the body can’t control parasites and remove them from the bloodstream because the immune system is suppressed and can’t fully function. The immune system cannot be properly trained,” she explains.

“By treating people with asymptomatic malaria infections, we reduce the reservoir of invisible parasites that perpetuate infection and thwart efforts in malaria eradication campaigns,” she said, the study believes. She provides the basis for. New policies and processes to support detection. Incidence of asymptomatic malaria in endemic areas around the world.